Portrait and text for Italian DJ Danny Vice.

Portrait and text for Italian DJ Danny Vice.

Your Time Here zine.

10 hand drawn illustrations encouraging you to log off, live well and make the most of your time.

BUY IT HERE!

Patrick Mckenzie for Hacker Monthly.

Thanks to AD Lim Cheng Soon.

It’s Make&Do pop up tomorrow at The Birdcage, Norwich.
You’re coming, right?

It’s Make&Do pop up tomorrow at The Birdcage, Norwich.

You’re coming, right?

Pet portrait for local lad Callum Painter (check his photography HERE). Happy Birthday dude!
Thanks to Cicely for the commission.

Pet portrait for local lad Callum Painter (check his photography HERE). Happy Birthday dude!

Thanks to Cicely for the commission.

Album cover for Blake Berglund & The Vultures.

My thanks to Blake and the guys for being good guys and awesome clients.

A series of portraits for Montreal based footwear retailer Call it Spring. These are all new upcoming musicians from the U.S. In order of appearance: Zendaya, Kilo Kish, The Posterz, Wiki and Becky G.

My thanks to the awesome AD Ben Pobjoy.

Some advice for graduates…

3rd year Plymouth student Dan Morris asked me a few questions recently. Thought I’d share the little interview for any other illustration students that may follow me.

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How did you get into this line of work?

I completed my foundation in Art & Design in 2003, originally thinking I would head for a degree in fine art. At the time though I had a lot trouble deciding what direction I should take my work as I just liked drawing, be it for design or fine art or anything else. As long as I was drawing I really didn’t mind what it was for. I eventually realised that I was most suited for Illustration and so embarked on a degree at Lincoln school of Art & Design. I graduated in 2007 and have kept at it since then.


Do you have any advice for a newbie upon graduating?
My biggest piece of advice for any new illustrator would be to get used to making changes in your work. I don’t get it so much for portraiture but for more imaginative images the client will often have a very distinct vision in mind. Sometimes it comes from what look they want their product or brand to convey. If your illustration isn’t quite matching what they had in mind then you’re going to get asked to make some changes to your work. This never seems to get any less infuriating but is a fact of this line of work and you just have to go along with it at times.
Especially for a graduate though I would say be ready for a big change of scene. At university I always had projects to get on with and the studio was a very busy and social environment. Not to put you off but upon graduating you may find that you’re left all to yourself and making any progress is all down to your own motivation. It’s a new challenge for sure.


Have you joined an agency, and do you think there would be any advantages to this?
┬áIn my 7 years of practice I have so far not had any good experiences with agencies. From one agency wanting to sign me up to a 2 year exclusive contract, asking for a 40% cut of all commissions to another not being computer savvy enough to open the zip file of my work that I sent them. I’ve given up on the idea at present. I often listen to pod casts made by U.S illustrators and many believe that with all the power in our hands from social media, agents are quickly becoming obsolete. I think one advantage of having an agent would be that your work will be presented to many big name clients that they’re in contact with. Also the agent will deal with fee negotiation and any contract squabbles for you, so that’s handy. At the moment however, I’m doing just fine without one.


What is your average turnaround time for a piece of work?
Depending on whats required of the piece, detail wise, I can usually get a an image made in two days if I really have to. Usually though a client will give me at least a month before deadline. I’m quite impatient however so I don’t like to work on anything that takes too long. In terms of actually making a piece I’d say 3-4 days is usual for me. One for roughs, one for drawing and inking and another two for colouring and finishing touches. There will be gaps between these days though when I’m waiting to hear back from the client for the go ahead.


How are you finding being a freelance illustrator?
I’m finding it to be quite a journey and to be honest I feel like I’m only just working it all out. I read an interview with U.S illustrator Sachin Teng recently and he summed it up perfectly saying ‘It’s like being on vacation all the time, and at work all the time’ (something like that?). I have a lot of time and general freedom and get to do my favourite thing as often as I like! That’s the best thing about it for me. I have a bit of a hard time budgeting and would like to make more money than I currently do. It can get a bit lonely at times too. Those are the only cons. If you have a degree under your belt then I’d say you’re in the best position to go for it and see what happens. :)

Print Size: 308 x 450mm 300gsm Fedrigoni Acroprint PaperSigned and Numbered Limited edition of 20
Get it HERE!

Print Size: 308 x 450mm
300gsm Fedrigoni Acroprint Paper
Signed and Numbered
Limited edition of 20

Get it HERE!

Latest footwears up over at Shoeportraits.tumblr.
Check out the rest and follow!

Latest footwears up over at Shoeportraits.tumblr.

Check out the rest and follow!